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The Blessed Isles
Nº. 1 of  23

The Blessed Isles

A Celtic Witchcraft and Nature Blog.
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fornsed:

What IS A Celt?

Actually the term “Keltoi” is of Greek origin, not Julius Caesar ( by Hecataeus of Miletus, in 517 BC ) but i still feel that this kind of “antiromanticism” is important.

Using the term “Celt” makes things easier but one should be aware of how flimsy a term it really is beyond the purely linguistic.

(via supereklektik)

Kelpies (Celtic mythology)

queenselkie:

The Kelpie is a water spirit that primarily resides in the depths of Scottish waters. Kelpies are usually depicted as small black horses, but there have been accounts of green and white ones as well. They also possess the ability to manifest a human appearance.

While Kelpies appear benevolent, they are actually malicious spirits who carry off and drown anyone who tries to mount them. They are also known to steal young women away from their homes. In one story, a male Kelpie steals away a woman and forces her to live with him and bear a child. Years later, she manages to leave the Kelpie and their young child, and she escapes to her human family onshore. She thinks she is safe, but the angry Kelpie wreaks havoc that night by creating a storm that nearly destroys her family’s town. The following morning brings a clear sky and she assumes the worst is over, but she opens the door to find her child’s severed head on the front porch.

(via natural-magics)

under-bergets-rot:

yggdrasill—:

violentpurge09:

The Irish werewolf is different from the Teutonic or European werewolf, as it is really not a “monster” at all. Unlike its continental cousins, this shapeshifter is the guardian and protector of children, wounded men and lost persons. According to some ancient sources, the Irish werewolves were even recruited by kings in time of war. Known in their native land as the faoladh or conroicht, their predatory behaviour is typical of the common wolf, not beneath the occasional nocturnal raid 

under-bergets-rot:

yggdrasill—:

violentpurge09:

The Irish werewolf is different from the Teutonic or European werewolf, as it is really not a “monster” at all. Unlike its continental cousins, this shapeshifter is the guardian and protector of children, wounded men and lost persons. According to some ancient sources, the Irish werewolves were even recruited by kings in time of war. Known in their native land as the faoladh or conroicht, their predatory behaviour is typical of the common wolf, not beneath the occasional nocturnal raid 

(via thewarriorsprayer)

celticmysticism:

Celtic women achieved high positions in society and a standing which their Sisters in the majority of other contemporary European societies did not have. They were able to govern, they played an active part in political, social and religious life. They could be warriors, doctors, physicians, judges and poets. They could own property and remain the owner of that property even when married/divorced. They had sexual freedom, were free to choose their partners and could claim damages if abused, molested or beaten up. Celtic women could, and often did, lead their men into battle.The Roman Deodorizes Sickles observed “The women of the Celts are nearly as tall as the men and they rival them also in courage”. Another report by Amicus Marcelling states “A whole troop of foreigners would not be able to withstand a single Celt if he called his wife to his assistance”! So women went to war in the ancient Celtic world and took command of men. The, training of a warrior was a long task, frequently undertaken by warrior women who were responsible for teaching boys the arts of combat and of love. Specific titles were given to these classes of female warriors such as Ban Gaisgedaig (Ban meaning woman and a derivative of Gas which means young warrior) and Ban Fejnnidh (which combines BAN with Feinnidh meaning ‘band of warriors’) So it seems they were classed according to age and experience, possibly starting their training as very young girls. Women warriors even appear on Celtic coins as a common iconographic theme. Boudicca, warrior-Queen of the Iceni, was a ruler of her people in her own right, and accepted as a war leader against the Romans not only by her own tribe but by the Triumvirates and other neighbouring tribes who joined her, such as the Cretans. Less well-known is our own warrior queen Sgathaich, who presided over a famous military academy at the South end of Skye. Near to Tarscavaig. Overlooking the bay of Ob Gausca Vaig (Whale Bay) stand the ruins of Dunscaith Castle, said to mean ‘the Fort of Shadows’, a stronghold of Sgathaich.  via Circle of the Morrighan

celticmysticism:

Celtic women achieved high positions in society and a standing which their Sisters in the majority of other contemporary European societies did not have. They were able to govern, they played an active part in political, social and religious life. They could be warriors, doctors, physicians, judges and poets. They could own property and remain the owner of that property even when married/divorced. They had sexual freedom, were free to choose their partners and could claim damages if abused, molested or beaten up. Celtic women could, and often did, lead their men into battle.

The Roman Deodorizes Sickles observed “The women of the Celts are nearly as tall as the men and they rival them also in courage”. 

Another report by Amicus Marcelling states “A whole troop of foreigners would not be able to withstand a single Celt if he called his wife to his assistance”! 

So women went to war in the ancient Celtic world and took command of men. The, training of a warrior was a long task, frequently undertaken by warrior women who were responsible for teaching boys the arts of combat and of love. Specific titles were given to these classes of female warriors such as Ban Gaisgedaig (Ban meaning woman and a derivative of Gas which means young warrior) and Ban Fejnnidh (which combines BAN with Feinnidh meaning ‘band of warriors’) 
So it seems they were classed according to age and experience, possibly starting their training as very young girls. Women warriors even appear on Celtic coins as a common iconographic theme. Boudicca, warrior-Queen of the Iceni, was a ruler of her people in her own right, and accepted as a war leader against the Romans not only by her own tribe but by the Triumvirates and other neighbouring tribes who joined her, such as the Cretans. Less well-known is our own warrior queen Sgathaich, who presided over a famous military academy at the South end of Skye. Near to Tarscavaig. Overlooking the bay of Ob Gausca Vaig (Whale Bay) stand the ruins of Dunscaith Castle, said to mean ‘the Fort of Shadows’, a stronghold of Sgathaich.  via Circle of the Morrighan

(Source: celticmysticism, via amaranthinelover)

sariazbest:

Celtic goddess by Selena Fenech

sariazbest:

Celtic goddess by Selena Fenech

(via lily-grove)

thecandidcrow:

Brigid

As a Celtic solar goddess and patroness of smiths, Brigid’s attributes include fire. She is also linked with the healing properties of sacred springs.

thecandidcrow:

Brigid

As a Celtic solar goddess and patroness of smiths, Brigid’s attributes include fire. She is also linked with the healing properties of sacred springs.

(via amaranthinelover)

Those who contemplate the beauty of the earth find reserves of strength that will endure as long as life lasts. There is something infinitely healing in the repeated refrains of nature — the assurance that dawn comes after night, and spring after winter.

Rachel Carson (via evanescentlove)

(Source: heartbloodspirit, via faeheart92)

Nº. 1 of  23